Tag Archives: xtend

The second edition of the Xtext book has been published

The second edition of the Xtext book, Implementing Domain-Specific Languages with Xtext and Xtend, was published at the end of August: https://www.packtpub.com/web-development/implementing-domain-specific-languages-xtext-and-xtend-second-edition. So… get it while it’s hot 🙂

4965OS_5541_Implementing Domain Specific Languages with Xtext and Xtend - Second Edition

Please, see my previous post for details about the novelties in this edition.

Sources of the examples are on github: https://github.com/LorenzoBettini/packtpub-xtext-book-2nd-examples.

Hope you’ll enjoy the book!

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The forthcoming second edition of the Xtext book

The second edition of the Xtext book should be published soon! In the meantime it is already available for preorders. At the time of writing, you can benefit for discounts and preorder it at 10$.

xtext-book-2nd-edition-forthcoming

I’ll detail the differences and novelties of this second edition.

But, first things first! A huge thank you to , for reviewing this second edition, and a special thank you to Sven Efftinge, for writing the foreword to this second edition. I am also grateful to itemis Schweiz, and in particular, to Serano Colameo for sponsoring the writing of this book.

While working on this second edition, I updated all the contents of the previous edition in order to make them up to date with respect to what Xtext provides in the most recent release (at the time of writing, it is 2.10).

All the examples have been rewritten from scratch. The main examples, Entities, Expressions and SmallJava, are still there, but many parts of the DSLs, including their features and implementations, have been modified and improved, focusing on efficient implementation techniques and the best practices I learned in these years. Thus, while the features of most of the main example DSLs of the book is the same as in the first edition, their implementation is completely new.

Moreover, In the last chapters, many more examples are also introduced.

Chapter 11 on Continuous Integration, which in the previous edition was called “Building and Releasing”, has been completely rewritten and it is now based on Maven/Tycho and on Gradle, since Xtext now provides a project wizard that also creates a build configuration for these build tools. Building with Maven/Tycho is described in more details in the chapter, and Gradle is briefly described. This new chapter also briefly describes the new Xtext features: DSL editor on the web and also on IntelliJ.

I also added a brand new chapter at the end of the book, Chapter 13 “Advanced Topics”, with much more advanced material and techniques that are useful when your DSL grows in size and features. For example, the chapter will show how to manually maintain the Ecore model for your DSL in several ways, including Xcore. This chapter also presents an advanced example that extends Xbase, including the customization of its type system and compiler. An introduction to Xbase is still presented in Chapter 12, as in the previous edition, but with more details.

As in the previous edition, the book fosters unit testing a lot. An entire chapter, Chapter 7 “Testing”, is still devoted to testing all aspects of an Xtext DSL implementation.

Most chapters, as in the previous edition, still have a tutorial nature.

Summarizing, while the title and the subject of most chapters is still the same, their contents have been completely reviewed, extended and, hopefully, improved.
If you enjoyed the first edition of the book and found it useful, I hope you’ll like this second edition even more.

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Analyzing Xtend code with Sonarqube

I recently started to play with Sonarqube to reduce “technical debt” and hopefully improve code quality (see my previous post). I’d like to report on my experiences about using Sonarqube to analyze Xtend code.

Xtend compiles into Java source code, so it looks like it is trivial to analyze it with Sonarqube; of course, Sonarqube will analyze the generated Java code, but it’s rather easy to refer to the original Xtend code, since Xtend generates clean Java code 🙂

However, we Sonarqube 4.4 it looks like it’s harder than I thought due to some facts:

My starting point was another issue: test results did not show in the Sonarqube 4.4 web interface, and that was because test detection has changed in version 4 (http://sonarqube.15.x6.nabble.com/quot-Unit-test-success-quot-in-Sonarqube-4-4-td5028019.html).

I created an example to reproduce the problem and propose a solution: https://github.com/LorenzoBettini/tycho-xtend-sonar.

In the parent project we specify the actual project with sources to be analyzed, and the project containing tests (in this example I also use jacoco for code coverage, but that’s not crucial for this example):

And we enable all the Maven plug-ins for

The plugin and the plugin.tests projects intentionally contain Xtend and Java files with some Findbugs issues, e.g.,

Now, assuming you have Sonarqube 4.4 running on your machine, you can run the typical maven commands to analyze your code (make sure you set the MaxPermSize in the MAVEN_OPTS otherwise the Xtend compiler will run out of memory):

If you go to Sonarqube web interface you see

sonarqube xtend 1So you see that Sonarqube correctly detected Findbugs issues in all the Java files, but for the Java code generated by Xtend, it only detected the issues in the plugin.tests project, not on the plugin project (as explained here http://sonarqube.15.x6.nabble.com/sonarqube-findbugs-and-generated-sources-td5028237.html, Sonarqube does “not take into consideration this suppress warnings annotation in test files”).

To deal with this problem, I created an ant file which basically removes all the @SuppressWarnings(“all”) annotations in all the generated Java files in the xtend-gen folder:

and I created a Maven profile in the parent pom that, when activated, invokes the ant target, in the process-sources phase (recall that this phase is executed after generate-sources phase, when the Xtend files are compiled into Java code)

Now, let’s invoke the two maven commands, but this time, the first one activates the above profile

OK, let’s go to the “Issues Drilldown” in the Sonarqube web interface and this time the issues are detected also in the plugin project:

sonarqube xtend 2You may want to select “Since previous analysis” in the combo box, to make sure that this analysis detected these new issues:

sonarqube xtend 3

Hope this helps! 🙂

The source code can be found here: https://github.com/LorenzoBettini/tycho-xtend-sonar.

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Using the Xtend compiler in Buckminster builds

Up to now, I was always putting the Xtend generated Java files in my git repositories (for my Xtext projects), since I still hadn’t succeeded in invoking the Xtend standalone compiler in a Buckminster build. Dennis Hübner published a post with some hints on how to achieve that, but that never worked for me (and apparently it did not work for other users).

After some experiments, it seems I finally managed to trigger Xtend compilation in Buckminster builds, and in this post I’ll show the steps to achieve that (I’m using an example you can find on Github).

The main problems I had to solve were:

  • how to pass the classpath to the Xtend compiler
  • how to deal with chicken-and-egg problems (dependencies among Java and Xtend classes).

IMPORTANT: the build process described here uses a new flag for the Buckminster’s build command, which has been recently added; thus, you must make sure you have an updated version of Buckminster headless (from 4.3 repository).

The steps to perform can be applied to your projects as well; they are simple and easy to reproduce. In this blog post I’ll try to explain them in details.

This blog post assumes that you are already familiar with setting up a Buckminster build.

The example

The example I’m using is an Xtext DSL (just the Greeting example using Xbase), with many .xtend files and with the standard structure:

  • org.xtext.example.hellobuck, the runtime plugin,
  • org.xtext.example.hellobuck.ui, the ui plugin, which uses Xtend classes defined in the runtime plugin,
  • org.xtext.example.hellobuck.tests, the tests plugin, which uses Xtend classes defined in the runtime and in the ui plugin,
  • org.xtext.example.hellobuck.sdk, the SDK feature for the DSL.

Furthermore, we have two additional projects created by the Xtext Buckminster Wizard:

  • org.xtext.example.hellobuck.buckminster, the releng project,
  • org.xtext.example.hellobuck.site, the feature project for creating the p2 repository,

I blogged about the Xtext Buckminster Wizard in the past, and indeed this example is a fork of the example presented in that blog post.

Creating a launch configuration for the Xtend compiler

The first step consists in creating a Java launch configuration in the runtime plugin project that invokes the Xtend standalone compiler. This was shown in Dennis’ original post, but you need to change a few things. Here’s the XtendCompiler.launch file to put in the org.xtext.example.hellobuck runtime plugin project (of course you can call the launch file whateven you want):

This launch configuration can be reused in other projects, provided the highlighted lines are changed accordingly, since they refer to the containing project.

An important part of this launch configuration is the PROGRAM_ARGUMENTS that are passed to the Xtend compiler, in particular the -classpath argument. This was the main problem I experienced in the past (and that I saw in all the other posts in the forum): the Xtend compiler needs to find the Java classes your Xtend files depend upon and thus you need to pass a valid -classpath argument. But we can simply reuse the classpath of the containing project 🙂

Add dependency for Xtend standalone compiler

This launch configuration calls the Java application org.eclipse.xtend.core.compiler.batch.Main thus you must add a dependency on the corresponding bundle in your MANIFEST.MF. The bundle you need to depend on is org.eclipse.xtend.standalone (the dependency can be optional):

xtend_standalone_dependency

 

Test the launch in your workbench

You can test this launch configuration from Eclipse, with Run As => Java Application. In the Console view you should see something like:

This will give you confidence that the launch configuration works correctly and that all dependencies for invoking the Xtend compiler are in place.

Add an XtendCompiler.launch in the other projects

You must now add an XtendCompiler.launch in all the other projects containing Xtend files. In our example we must add it to the ui and the tests projects.

You can copy the one you have already created but MAKE SURE you update the relevant 3 parts according to the containing projects! See the highlighted lines above.

NOTE: you do NOT need to add a dependency on org.eclipse.xtend.standalone in the MANIFEST.MF of the ui and tests projects: they depend on the runtime plugin project which already has that dependency.

You may want to run the XtendCompiler.launch also in these projects from the Eclipse workbench, again to get confidence that you configured the launch configurations correctly.

IMPORTANT: when the Xtend compiler compiles the files in the ui and tests project, you will see some ERROR lines, e.g.,

From what I understand, these errors do not prevent the Xtend compiler to successfully generate Java files (see the final INFO line) and the procedure terminates successfully. Thus, you can ignore these errors. If the Xtend compiler really cannot produce Java files it will terminate with a final error.

Configure the headless build

Now it’s time to configure the Buckminster headless build so that it runs the Xtend compiler. We created .launch files because one of the cool things of Buckminster is that it can seamlessly run the launch files.

The tricky part here is that since we perform a clean build, there is a chicken-and-egg scenario

  • no Java files have been compiled,
  • most Java files import Java files created by Xtend
  • the Xtend files import Java classes

To solve these problems we perform an initial clean build; this will run the Java compiler and such compilation will terminate with errors. We expect that, due to the chicken-and-egg situation. However, this will create enough .class files to run the Xtend compiler! It is important to run the build command with the (new) flag –continueonerror, otherwise the whole build will fail.

After running XtendCompiler.launch in the org.xtext.example.hellobuck runtime project, we run another build –continueonerror so that the Java files generated by the Xtend compiler will be compiled by Java. We then proceed similarly for the ui and the tests project:

Then, your build can proceed as usual (at this point I prefer to perform a clean build): run the tests (both plain Junit and Plug-in Junit tests) and create the p2 repository:

The complete commands file can be seen here.

Executing the headless build

You can now run your headless build on your machine or on Jenkins.

My favorite way of doing that is by using an ANT script. The whole ANT script can be found in the example.

This script also automatically installs Buckminster headless if not present.

Before executing the commands file, it also removes the contents of the xtend-gen folder in all the projects; this way you are sure that no stale generated Java files are there.

Of course, you should now remove the xtend-gen folder from your git repository (and put it in the .gitignore file).

In Jenkins you can configure an Invoke Ant build step as shown in the screenshot (“Start Xvfb before the build, and shut it down after” is required to execute Plug-in Junit tests; we also pass an option to install Buckminster headless in the job’s workspace).

xtext-xtend-buckminster-jenkins

Try the example

You can just clone the git repository, and then

As noted above, this will also install Buckminster headless if not found in the location specified by the property buckminster.home. This script will take some time, especially the first time, since it will materialize the target platform.

Hope you find this blog post useful! 🙂

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The book on Xtext is out

My book on Xtext, “Implementing Domain-Specific Languages with Xtext and Xtend” is now available on Packt website! Get it while it’s hot! 🙂

You can find the outline and an example chapter at

http://www.packtpub.com/implementing-domain-specific-languages-with-xtext-and-xtend/book

Many thanks to the reviewers of the book: Jan Koehnlein, Henrik Lindberg, Pedro J. Molina, and Sebastian Zarnekow!

The sources of the examples presented in the book are available at https://github.com/LorenzoBettini/packtpub-xtext-book-examples

0304OS_mockupcover_normalI would also like to thank all the people from Packt I dealt with.

 

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