Enabling Hibernation on Ubuntu 20.04

I have never been able to make hibernation (suspend to disk) work on my laptops (Dell M3800 and Dell XPS 13 9370) on Ubuntu with systemd. The symptom was that running

was making the system shutdown, but then upon restart the system was not restored: it was just like booting the system from scratch.

I had also tried with uswsusp (which is installed if you install the package hibernate), with its program s2disk, but I experienced many problems: it wasn’t working reliably and it was making booting (even standard booting) much longer (several seconds more).

Then, after looking at several blog posts, I found that the solution is rather simple, and I’ll detail the steps here. I’ll also show how to use suspend-then-hibernate.

First, you need to have swap already setup, e.g., a swap partition (though I think a swap file would work as well, but in that case the configuration is slightly more complex). For example in /etc/fstab you should have something like

The UUID is important and you should take note of it.

How big should the swap be? You can find some hints here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SwapFaq. I have 16Gb of RAM and my swap partition is 20 Gb.

Then, you must make sure initramfs is “aware” of your swap partition and that it is already able to “resume” from that. This should already be the case but you can try to run

and after some time you should see something like:

The UUID must be the same as your swap UUID in the /etc/fstab.

Now, it’s just a matter of editing your /etc/default/grub and make sure you specify resume in GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT, with the UUID of your swap partition. So it should be something like (remember that <UUID of your swap partition> must be replaced with the UUID):

Save the file and update grub:

Reboot the system and now try to hibernate again (first you might want to start a few applications so that you’re sure that the system is effectively restored to the same state):

Wait for the system to shut down and switch it on again. The splash screen should tell you something about that it is “resuming from <your swap partition>”. If all goes well you’ll have to enter your password to unlock the system which you should find in the state you left it before hibernating! 🙂

suspend-then-hibernate

Another interesting mechanism provided by systemd is suspend-then-hibernate: the system is suspended (to RAM) and after some time it is hibernated (suspended to disk).

The amount of time before hibernating is defined in the file /etc/systemd/sleep.conf. Let’s have a look at the default contents:

By default everything is commented out, but the values, as stated at the beginning of the file, represent the default values. So you can see that suspend-then-hibernate is enabled and that the default delay time before hibernating is 180 minutes. If you’re not happy with that value, uncomment the line and change the value. For example, I set it to 10 minutes:

You can now test this functionality with this command:

The system will suspend to RAM and if you don’t touch the computer after 10 minutes you can hear some sounds: the system will effectively hibernate.

If you want to make this mechanisms the default suspend mechanism, e.g., you close the lid and the system will suspend and then after some time it will hibernate, you CANNOT set the value of SuspendMode in the file above, since that has another meaning. To make suspend-then-hibernate the default suspend mechanism you have to create this symlink:

No need to restart, try to close the lid and the laptop will suspend, after 10 minutes it will hibernate.

Please, keep in mind that the above command will completely replace the behavior of suspend.

If you want to have a finer grain control, you might want to edit the file /etc/systemd/logind.conf, in particular uncomment and set the entries (then you’ll have to restart or restart the systemd-logind.service service):

which should be self-explicative, but I haven’t tested this approach.

Happy hibernating 🙂

1 thought on “Enabling Hibernation on Ubuntu 20.04

  1. Pingback: Grub remembers the last choice | Lorenzo Bettini

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