Tag Archives: kde

Cropping images with KDE Gwenview

I’ve always been using GIMP for cropping images (for articles, books, etc.), and it works pretty well, but I never thought that you could do the same much quicker with the default image viewer of KDE, Gwenview. In KDE Plasma, I’ve always used Gwenview as an image viewer, but it’s much more:

Gwenview is a fast and easy to use image viewer by KDE, ideal for browsing and displaying a collection of images.

Features:

  • Supports simple image manipulations: rotate, mirror, flip, and resize
  • Supports basic file management actions such as copy, move, delete, and others

In fact, you just open an image with Gwenview:

Press “Show Editing Tools” and then select “Crop” from the palette:

The box for cropping is ready to be resized:

When you’re done, just press ENTER:

and the image is ready to be saved!

With GIMP, the number of steps is much more significant.

Moreover, with Gwenview, once you cropped and saved the current image, you just press the right arrow to go to the next one. Much faster!

KDE Plasma 5.25 in Arch

After the recent release of KDE Plasma 5.25, this version landed a few days ago in Arch-based distros like EndeavourOS (the one I’m writing from).

Although I’m mostly a GNOME user, I also have a few distributions installed where I’m using KDE Plasma.

The new features that impressed me most are related to eye candies 🙂

First, the “Present Windows” effect now looks the same as the new “Overview” effect. If we compare the “Present Windows” effect in the previous version (5.24):

with the new one:

we can see a significant improvement: in the earlier versions, the windows not selected were too dark, making it hard to distinguish them. This behavior relates to an old bug (10 years old): https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=303438. This bug has been fixed by rewriting this effect “to use the same modern, maintainable backend technology found in the Overview effect.”

I use this effect a lot (I also configured the “Super” key to use this effect, simulating what happens in Gnome for its “Activities” view), and I use the filter to filter the open windows quickly. So I appreciate this usability change a lot!

One detail I do not like in this new version of “Present Windows” is that the filter textbox remembers the entered text. Thus, the next time you use it, the presented windows are already filtered according to the previously entered text. I’m not sure I like this.

The other cool thing introduced is the automatic accent color! Accent colors were introduced a few versions ago in Plasma, but now you can have Plasma automatically adjust the accent color from the current wallpaper:

If you use a wallpaper changer mechanism (like the one provided by Plasma), possibly by downloading new wallpapers (like Variety), you will get nice accent colors during the day. Here are a few examples produced running Variety to change the wallpaper:

Maybe it’s not an important feature, but, as we say in Italy, “Anche l’occhio vuole la sua parte” 😉

The last new feature that positively impressed me is that now KRunner also shows Java files (and probably other programming languages related files) when you search a string. Previously, although “Baloo” (the file indexing and file search framework for KDE) knew about these files, KRunner was only showing .txt files and a few others, but not Java files.

Concerning Wayland, one thing I noted is that if I start a Plasma Wayland session using a brand new user, it automatically scales the display in case of an HDPI screen. Wayland usability in Plasma has not improved since my last experiments (see KDE Plasma and Wayland: usability).

 

KDE Plasma and Wayland: usability

It looks like KDE Plasma is getting usable with Wayland!

This is my current testing environment for this blog post:

Operating System: EndeavourOS
KDE Plasma Version: 5.24.5
KDE Frameworks Version: 5.94.0
Qt Version: 5.15.4
Kernel Version: 5.15.41-1-lts (64-bit)
Graphics Platform: Wayland
Processors: 8 × Intel® Core™ i7-8550U CPU @ 1.80GHz
Memory: 15,3 GiB of RAM
Graphics Processor: Mesa Intel® UHD Graphics 620

I had tested KDE Plasma with Wayland in the past, and the main problem I was experiencing, which made it unusable to me, was that I had to scale the display. I could scale the display, but the main problem was that, while KDE applications looked nice, the GTK applications looked blurred. This problem is still there, as you can see from this screenshot (here, I scaled the display to 150%):

You can see that the System settings dialog and Dolphin (in the background) look nice, but the EndeavourOS Welcome app and Firefox (in the background), which are GTK applications, look blurred!

Thus, I tried another way: I went back to 100% Display and tried to work on the Font HDPI scaling, though Plasma discourages doing that (it suggests using the display scaling). I tried with both 120 and 140 the result is satisfactory, as you can see from these screenshots:

IMPORTANT: You have to log out and log in to apply these changes. At least, I had to do that in my experiments.

There’s still one caveat to solve: GTK4 applications, like Gedit (the Gnome text editor) and Eye of Gnome (the Gnome image viewer), which, in this version of EndeavourOS, are already provided in their 42 version (using libadwaita). These applications are not considering font scaling. To solve that, you have to install Gnome Tweaks and adjust the “Scaling Factor” from there. Then, everything works also for those applications (Gedit is the one with “Untitled Document 1,” and Eye of Gnome is the dark window in the foreground):

With the Wayland session in Plasma, you can enjoy the default touchpad gestures (which, at the moment, are not configurable):

  • 4 Finger Swipe Left –> Next Virtual Desktop.
  • 4 Finger Swipe Right –> Previous Virtual Desktop.
  • 4 Finger Swipe Up –> Desktop Grid.
  • 4 Finger Swipe Down –> Available Window Grid.

Moreover, the scrolling speed for the touchpad can be configured (while, on X11, I wasn’t able to):

There are still a few strange things happening: the splash screen has the title bar and window buttons if you start Eclipse! 😀

I’ll try to experiment with this configuration also in other distributions.

Let’s cross our fingers! 😉

Playing with KDE Plasma Themes

I want to share some of my experiences with KDE Plasma Themes in this post.

These themes are pretty powerful, but, as it often happens with KDE and its configuration capabilities, it might not be immediately clear how to benefit from all its power and all its themes’ power.

I’m assuming that you already enabled the KWin Blur effect (In “Desktop Effects”), which is usually the case by default. Please remember that desktop effects, like “blur,” applied to menus, windows, etc., will use more CPU. This CPU usage might increase battery usage (but, at least from my findings, it’s not that much).

First, installing a theme using “Get New Global Themes…” is not ideal. In my experiments, the installation often makes the System Settings crash; the artifacts of the theme might be out of date concerning the current Plasma version. Moreover, the installation usually does not install other required artifacts, like icons and, most of all, the Kvantum theme corresponding to the Plasma theme. In particular, the themes that I use in this post all come with the corresponding Kvantum theme. Using such an additional theme configuration is crucial to enjoying that Plasma theme thoroughly.

Thus, I’ll always install themes and icons from sources in this post.

I mentioned Kvantum, which you have to install first. In recent Ubuntu distributions

In other distributions, the package(s) names might be different.

Quoting from Kvantum site:

Kvantum […] is an SVG-based theme engine for Qt, tuned to KDE and LXQt, with an emphasis on elegance, usability and practicality. Kvantum has a default dark theme, which is inspired by the default theme of Enlightenment. Creation of realistic themes like that for KDE was my first reason to make Kvantum but it goes far beyond its default theme: you could make themes with very different looks and feels for it, whether they be photorealistic or cartoonish, 3D or flat, embellished or minimalistic, or something in between, and Kvantum will let you control almost every aspect of Qt widgets. Kvantum also comes with many other themes that are installed as root and can be selected and activated by using Kvantum Manager.

As described in https://github.com/tsujan/Kvantum/blob/master/Kvantum/INSTALL.md,

The contents of theme folders (if valid) can also be installed manually in the user’s home. The possible installation paths are ~/.config/Kvantum/$THEME_NAME/, ~/.themes/$THEME_NAME/Kvantum/ and ~/.local/share/themes/$THEME_NAME/Kvantum/, each one of which takes priority over the next one, i.e. if a theme is installed in more than one path, only the instance with the highest priority will be used by Kvantum.

On the contrary, the KDE themes artifacts are searched for in ~/.local/share. Since some of the themes we will install from the source do not provide an installation script, we will have to copy artifacts manually. In the meantime, you might want to create the Kvantum config directory (though the installation commands we will see in this post will take care of that anyway):

After Kvantum is installed, going to “Appearance” -> “Application Style,” you’ll see the kvantum style that you can select as an application style (we won’t do that right now). Once that’s set, the application style will be configured through the Kvantum Manager, which we’ll see in a minute.

So let’s start installing and playing with a few themes. As I anticipated initially, we’ll install the themes from sources. You’ll need git to do that. If not already installed, you should do that right now.

Nordic KDE

https://github.com/EliverLara/Nordic

This theme does not come with an installation script, so I’ll show all the commands to clone its source repository and manually copy its contents to the correct directories (see the note above concerning directories for Plasma and Kvantum themes):

Now, we got to “Appearance” -> “Global Theme,” and we find two new entries for the Nordic theme we’ve just installed:

Select one of the Nordic global themes (I chose “Nordic”) and press “Apply.”

Here’s the result (this is not yet the final intended look of the theme):

We can see that the menus are nicely blurred (of course, if you like blur effect 🙂

Go to “Application Style,” you see that “kvantum” is selected (that has happened automatically when selecting the “Nordic” global theme):

However, we still need to apply the Nordic Kvantum theme.

Launch Kvantum Manager, select one of the Nordic themes (Kvantum finds the Nordic Kvantum theme because we installed them in the correct position in the home folder), and press “Use this theme”:

and now everything looks consistent with the Nordic theme (the menu is still blurred). Keep in mind that applications have to be restarted to see the new theme applied to them:

Let’s make sure that applications like Dolphin are blurred themselves: go to the tab “Configure Active Theme” -> “Hacks” and make sure “Transparent Dolphin View” is selected. IMPORTANT: if you use fractional scaling in Plasma (e.g., I use 150% or 175%), you must ensure that “Disable translucency with non-integer scaling” is NOT selected.

Scroll down and press “Save”; remember to restart the applications. Now enjoy the nice translucent blurred effect in many applications (including the Kvantum manager itself); I changed the wallpaper to something lighter to appreciate the transparency better:

Of course, you can change a few Kvantum Nordic theme configurations parameters, including the opacity and other things.

You might also have to log out and log in to the Plasma session to see the theming applied to everything.

This theme also installs a Konsole color scheme, so you can create a new Konsole profile using such a color scheme: here’s the excellent result (this color scheme comes with blurred background by default):

In this example, I’m still using the standard Breeze icon theme, but of course, you might want to select a different icon theme.

Lyan

https://github.com/vinceliuice/Layan-kde

Lyan is one of my favorite themes (and one of the most appreciated in general). It’s based on the Tela icon theme (also very beautiful), https://github.com/vinceliuice/Tela-icon-theme, so we’ll have to install the icon theme first. Both come with an installation (and, in case, an uninstallation) script so that everything will be much easier! We’ll have to clone their repositories and then run the installation script.

These are the command lines to run to set them both up (note the -a in the Tela installation command: this will install all the color variants; if you only want to install the default variant or just a subset, please have a look at the project site):

Then, the procedure to apply the Global Theme and the corresponding Kvantum theme is the same as before. Once you have selected the Global Theme and the Kvantum theme for Lyan, you should get something like that:

Look at all the beautiful transparency and blur effects on Dolphin, on the title bars, and in some parts of Kate and the System Settings, not to mention the blur on menus.

WhiteSur

https://github.com/vinceliuice/WhiteSur-kde

This theme is for macOS look and feel fans. I’m not one of those but let’s try that as well 🙂

For this theme as well, we’ll install the recommended icons (we can rely on their installation scripts also in this case):

Once the corresponding Global Theme is selected, if you are using a fractional scaling like me (as I also said before), you’ll get a nasty surprise: huge borders as shown in the screenshot (independently from the selected Kvantum theme):

However, this theme comes with a few versions suitable for fractional scaling concerning “Window Decorations” (ignore the previews shown in the selection, which do not look good: that does not matter for the final result). There’s no version for my current 175% scaling, however, selecting the Window Decoration for 1.5, the borders are better, though still a bit too thick:

If you have a Window scaling factor for which there’s a specific Window Decoration of this theme, then everything looks fine. For example, with 150% scaling and by selecting the corresponding Window Decoration, the window borders look fine:

The rest of the screenshots are based on 175% scaling and the x1.5 variant. As I said, it does not look perfect, but that’s acceptable 😉

Note that if we apply this Global Theme, the installed WhiteSur icons are used as well.

After applying the Kvantum theme as before, changing the wallpaper with the one provided by this theme, and setting the Task Switcher to Large Icons here’s the result:

Please keep in mind that if you end up with thick borders, the resizing point is not exactly on the edge, but slightly inside, as shown in this screenshot:

Edna

https://gitlab.com/jomada/edna.git

This does not come with an installation script either. We’ll have to copy all the artifacts manually in the correct folders (in the following commands, directories are created as well if not already there):

This is another theme with the huge border problem when using fractional scaling:

Unfortunately, this one comes with a single version and no variant for fractional scaling. Thus, when using fractional scaling, we have to manually patch the theme: open the file ~/.local/share/aurorae/themes/Edna/Ednarc and change the lines

as follows (these values fit 150% scaling)

For 175% scaling, use the same values but this one

The windows already opened will still show the huge border, but the new windows will show smaller borders. Feel free to play with such values til you get a border size you like most. In the following screenshot, I’m using this theme together with the Tela icon (the green variant) that we installed before and I also created a new Konsole profile using the Konsole Edna color scheme (which comes with transparent background):

This theme also provides a complex Latte dock layout, with several docks. We won’t see this feature in this post, you might want to experiment with that.

Conclusions

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and that you’ll start playing with KDE themes as well 🙂

Accessing Google Online Account from GNOME and KDE

In this post, I’d like to share my experiences in setting a Google Online Account in GNOME and KDE. Actually, I have more than one Google account, and the procedures I show can be repeated for all your Google accounts.

First, a disclaimer: I’ve always loved KDE and I’ve used that since version 3. Lately, I have started to appreciate GNOME though. I’ve been using GNOME most of the time now, in most of my computers, for a few years. But lately, I started to experiment with KDE again, and I started to install that on some of my computers.

KDE is well-known for its customizability, while GNOME is known for the opposite. However, I must admit that in GNOME settings most of the things are trivial, while in KDE, you pay a lot for its customizability.

I think setting a Google Account is a good example of what I’ve just said. Of course, I might be wrong concerning the procedure I’ll show in this post, but, from what I’ve read around, especially for KDE, there doesn’t seem to be an easier way. Of course, if you know an easier procedure I’d like to know in the comments 🙂

In the following, I’m showing how to set a Google Account so that its features, mainly the calendar and access to Google Drive, get integrated into GNOME and KDE. I tested these procedures both in Ubuntu/Kubuntu and in Manjaro GNOME/KDE, but I guess that’s the same in other distributions.

TL;DR: in Gnome it’s trivial, in KDE you need some effort.

GNOME

Just open “Online Accounts”, and choose Google. Use the web form to log in and give the permissions so that GNOME can access all your Google data. As I said, I’m focusing on the calendar and drive. Repeat the same procedure for all your Google accounts you want to connect.

Done! In Files (Nautilus) you can see on the left, the links to your Google drive (or drives, if you configured several accounts). In the Gnome Calendar, you can choose the Google calendars you want to show. The events will be automatically shown in the top Gnome shell clock and calendar widget. Notifications will be automatically shown (by Evolution). For the Gnome Contacts, things are similar. By the way, also Gnome Tasks and other Gnome applications will be automatically able to access your Google accounts data.

To summarize, one single configuration and everything else is automatically integrated.

KDE

Now be prepared for an overwhelming number of steps, most of which, I’m afraid, I find rather complex and counter-intuitive.

In particular, you won’t get access to your Google account data in a single step. In fact, I’ll first show how to mount a Google drive and then how to set up the calendar.

Mount your Google drive

Go to

System Settings -> Online Accounts -> Add New Account -> Google

As usual, you get redirected to the “Web authentication for google”, login and give the consent allowing “KDE Online Accounts” to access some of your Google information, including drive, manage your YouTube videos, access your contacts, and calendar. (This procedure can be repeated for all your Google accounts if you have many.) Note that with all the permissions you give, you’d expect that then everything is automatically configured in KDE, but that’s not the case…

Back to the system settings, you get a “Google account”, not with your Google username or email, which is what I’d expect, but a simple “google” and a progress number (of course, you can rename it).

OK, now I can access my Google drive files from Dolphin and have my local calendar automatically connected to my Google calendar? Just like in Gnome? I’m afraid not… we’re still far away from that.

If you go to Dolphin’s Network place you see no Google drive mounted, nor a mechanism to do that… First, you have to install the package kio-gdrive (at least in Kubuntu and Manjaro KDE that’s not installed by default…). After that, back to Dolphin’s Network place you can expand the “Google Drive” folder and you get asked for the Google account you had previously configured. Select that, and “Use This Account For” -> “Drive” in Accounts Details. Now you can access your Google drive from Dolphin.

Add your Google calendar

What about my Google Calendar? First, you have to install the package korganizer (or the full suite kontact); again, at least in Kubuntu and Manjaro KDE, that’s not installed by default… Great, once installed I can simply select my previously configured Google account? Ehm… no… you “just” have to go to

Settings -> Configure KOrganizer -> General -> Calendars -> Add… -> Google Groupware -> a dialog appears, click “Configure…”

Now the browser (not a web dialog as before) is opened to login into your Google account. Then, give the permissions so that “This will allow Akonadi Resources for Google Services to…” (Again, you have to do the same for all your Google accounts you want to connect to.) In the browser, you then see: “You can close this tab and return to the application now.” Go back to the dialog in KOrganizer, and your calendars and tasks should already be selected (unselect anything you don’t want). OK, now in the previous dialog you should see KOrganizer synchronizing with your Google calendar and tasks.

Now I should get notifications from Google calendars events, right? Ehm… not necessarily: you need to make sure that in the “Status and Notifications” system tray, by right-clicking on “KOrganizer Reminders”, the “Enable Reminders” and “Start Reminder Daemon at Login” are selected (I see different default behaviors under that respect in different distributions). If not, enable them and log out and log in.

OK! But what about my Google calendar events in the standard “Digital Clock” widget in the corner of the system tray? Are they automatically shown just like in GNOME? No! There’s some more work to do! First, install kdepim-addons (guess what? At least in Kubuntu and Manjaro KDE, that’s not installed by default…). Now, go to “Digital Clock Settings” -> “Calendar” -> check “PIM Events Plugin” (quite counter-intuitive!) -> Apply; now a new “PIM Events Plugin” appears on the left, select that. Fortunately, this one will automatically propose to select all the calendars that have been previously configured in KOrganizer.

something similar for kaddressbook; probably with kontact the steps will be less, but I’ve always found Kontact chaotic…

Summary

Now, I like KDE customizations possibilities (while GNOME is pretty rigid about customizations and most things cannot be customized at all), but the above steps are far too much! After a few weeks, I wouldn’t be able to remember them correctly… In KDE, even the number of steps of the above procedures is overwhelming. You have to follow complex, heterogeneous and counter-intuitive procedures in KDE, and long menu chains. Maybe it’s the distribution’s fault? I doubt. I guess it’s an issue with the overall organization and integration in the KDE desktop environment. In GNOME the integration is just part of the desktop environment.

Fixing Right Click Touchpad in PineBook Pro

I recently bought a PineBook Pro (maybe I’ll review it in the future in another post). What annoyed me first was that the right click on the touchpad with a two-finger tap was basically unusable: you should be extremely fast.

In some forums, the solution is to issue this command

but then you have to make it somehow permanent.

Actually, it’s much easier than that: just use the KDE Setting (Tap DetectionMaximum time), and this will make it permanent right away:

Installing KDE on top of Ubuntu

If you like to use KDE you probably install Kubuntu directly, instead of Ubuntu, which has been based on Gnome for a long time now.

However, I like to have several Desktop Environments, and, now and then, I like to switch from Gnome to KDE and then back. Currently, I’m using Gnome for most of the time, that’s why I install Ubuntu (instead of Kubuntu).

In any case, you can still install KDE Plasma on top of Ubuntu. The following has been tested on an Ubuntu Disco 19.04, but I guess it will work also on previous distributions.

For a reduced installation of KDE you might want to install only these packages

In particular, kwin-addons includes some useful things: it contains additional KWin desktop and window switchers shipped in the Plasma 5 addons module.

When installation has finished you may want to reboot and then, on the Login screen, you can use the gear icon for specifying that you want to enter the KDE Plasma environment instead of the default Gnome environment.

The above packages should provide you with enough stuff to enjoy a Plasma experience, but it lacks many (K)ubuntu configurations and addons for KDE.

If you want more Kubuntu stuff, you might want to install the “huge” package:

And then you get a real Kubuntu KDE Plasma experience.

Note that this will replace the classic Ubuntu splash screen when booting the OS: it replaces it with the Kubuntu splash screen. If you want to go back to the original splash screen it’s just a matter of removing the following packages:

Remember that you can also use the Kubuntu Backport PPA for enjoying more recent versions of KDE software.

Enjoy Gnome and KDE! 🙂

Touchpad gestures in Linux KDE with Libinput-gestures

This post is based on my Dell M3800 with Linux Neon.

KDE already does a good job with touchpad gestures (e.g., two fingers for scrolling, 3 finger tap for pasting, etc.) but it does not support 3 finger swype gestures like in MacOs, e.g., for displaying all the windows or for showing the desktop.

Today I tried this utility, Libinput-gestures, which works like magic! The utility comes with good default for typical gestures (including pinch) but I configured that to fit my needs (in particular, I wanted to mimic MacOs behavior for 3 finger swypes: up = display all windows, down = display all windows of the same class and for pinch out = show desktop.

The installation of Linput-gestures is really easy (just follow the instructions at its web page).

Remember that, first of all, your user must be in the input group, so first run

Then logout from your current session, and login again.

Then, in Ubuntu, it’s just a matter of running

and install the software like this (you need git):

You can already start the program like this

and if you want it to be started at login time, then run

The default gestures are in /etc/libinput-gestures.conf. If you want to create your own custom gestures then copy that file to ~/.config/libinput-gestures.conf and edit it.

These are the lines I changed in my configuration (remember that each time you modify the configuration you need to restart libinput-gestures, i.e., instead of start in the command line above, just use restart):

You only need to know the keyboard shortcuts of the actions you want to associate to mouse gestures. With that respect, you might want to have a look at the current shortcuts in KDE Settings (the interesting components are “KWin” and “Plasma”):

This is a video demoing the gestures:

Happy gestures! 🙂

HiDPI in KDE Plasma

HiDPI support in KDE Plasma has been recently improved! I’m afraid what’s not improved is the procedure for using that. In this post I’ll detail the steps to use HiDPI with KDE if you have a high resolution display (for example, I have that in my Linux Dell M3800).

Remember that the settings you change will not be applied completely until you logout and login again into KDE.

First of all, you need to go in Settings, then

Display and Monitor” -> “Display Configuration“. If you scroll down you see a “Scale Display” button

kde_hidpi_1

Click on that and in the “Screen Scaling” dialog, drag the “Scale” in the middle, corresponding to a scale factor of 2 and press OK.

kde_hidpi_2

Then go back to the main page of Settings, select “Font“, and force to the DPI font to 168. (or even more if you want).

kde_hidpi_3

Apply the settings, logout and login again into KDE and you’ll enjoy your HiDPI display with a scale factor of 2, which basically means it will be usable 🙂

Be warned, KDE applications will look correctly, but there’ll still be other applications which might not have been implemented with HiDPI in mind… and they’ll still look horrible even with the scaling you set.